Instauratio magna [Novum organum]. FRANCIS BACON.
Instauratio magna [Novum organum]
Instauratio magna [Novum organum]
Instauratio magna [Novum organum]
Instauratio magna [Novum organum]
Instauratio magna [Novum organum]

Instauratio magna [Novum organum]

"I have taken all knowledge to be my province..."

FIRST EDITION OF ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT BOOKS IN THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE: FRANCIS BACON’S ARGUMENT FOR AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCIENTIFIC METHOD. A BEAUTIFUL COPY.

“The writings of Lord Bacon, and especially the “Novum Organum,” possess a fourfold interest: They have a direct bearing upon the history of philosophy, literature, logic, and physical science; and whatever estimate we may form of their influence upon each of these branches of knowledge, we think that few will fail to admit that Bacon threw a bridge over that vast and deep gulf which separates the ancient from the modern modes of thought, and directly opened a way to our present philosophy and science” (G.F. Rodwell, Bacon’s Novum Organum).

Bacon “insisted on experiment in determining truth in nature and the above book is a proposed method for the assessment of all knowledge. The accumulation of observation and fact must be the basis of a new philosophy and not the authority of Aristotle or anyone else... Bacon’s inspiration led directly to the formation of the Royal Society. The famous engraved title-page showing a ship boldly sailing beyond the Pillars of Hercules (the limits of the old world) is interpreted to represent the bold spirit of adventure and research of the new age of science” (Dibner 80). 



“Bacon conceived a massive plan for the reorganization of scientific method an gave purposeful thought to the relation of science to public and social life. His pronouncement ‘I have taken all knowledge to be my province’ is the motto of his work... The frontispiece to his magnum opus shows a ship in full sail passing through the Pillars of Hercules from the old to the new world. It symbolizes the vision of its author whose ambitious proposal was: ‘a total reconstruction of sciences, arts and all human knowledge... to extend the power and dominion of the human race... over the universe’” (Printing and the Mind of Man 119).



Second issue (as usual) with “Billium” only (omitting Bill Norton) in colophon and added errata. Complete with the famous engraved title by Simon van de Passe. London: John Bill, 1620. Folio (292x190 mm), contemporary full calf rebacked with original spine laid-down; custom box. Some soiling to binding and repairs to corners. Title page with early signature and notation in top margin, a few scattered rust spots, tiny tear to corner of B2. Overall, text extremely clean and crisp with wide margins.

AN OUTSTANDING COPY OF ONE OF THE FOUNDATIONAL WORKS IN THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE.

Price: $30,000 .

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