Item #2826 Sinfonie mit Schluss-Chor uber Schillers Ode, An die Freude fur grosses Orchester [THE NINTH SYMPHONY]. LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN.
Sinfonie mit Schluss-Chor uber Schillers Ode, An die Freude fur grosses Orchester [THE NINTH SYMPHONY]
Sinfonie mit Schluss-Chor uber Schillers Ode, An die Freude fur grosses Orchester [THE NINTH SYMPHONY]
Sinfonie mit Schluss-Chor uber Schillers Ode, An die Freude fur grosses Orchester [THE NINTH SYMPHONY]
Sinfonie mit Schluss-Chor uber Schillers Ode, An die Freude fur grosses Orchester [THE NINTH SYMPHONY]
Sinfonie mit Schluss-Chor uber Schillers Ode, An die Freude fur grosses Orchester [THE NINTH SYMPHONY]

Sinfonie mit Schluss-Chor uber Schillers Ode, An die Freude fur grosses Orchester [THE NINTH SYMPHONY]

“Everything will pass and the world will perish but the Ninth will remain” -Mikhail Bakunin

A MAGNIFICENT COPY OF THE FIRST EDITION, FIRST ISSUE, OF BEETHOVEN’S NINTH, ONE OF THE CROWNING ACHIEVEMENTS OF WESTERN MUSIC.

“Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 was ultimately more than three decades in the making. Schiller’s popular ‘Ode to Joy’ was published in 1785, and it is possible that Beethoven made his first of multiple attempts to set it to music in the early 1790s. He clearly revisited the poem in 1808 and 1811, as his notebooks include numerous remarks regarding possible settings. In 1812 Beethoven determined to place his setting of ‘Ode to Joy’ within a grand symphony.

“Ten more years passed before that symphony’s completion, and during that time Beethoven agonized over the composition’s every note. His notebooks indicate that he considered and rejected more than 200 different versions of the ‘Ode to Joy’ theme alone. When he finally finished the work, he offered to the public a radically new creation that was part symphony and part oratorio — a hybrid that proved puzzling to less-adventuresome listeners…

“The story of the premiere of Symphony No. 9 is widely told and disputed. Beethoven had steadily lost his hearing during the course of the symphony’s composition, and by the time of its premiere he was profoundly deaf. Although he appeared onstage as the general director of the performance, kapellmeister Michael Umlauf actually led the orchestra with the conductor’s baton, taking tempo cues from Beethoven. According to one account of the event, the audience applauded thunderously at the conclusion of the performance, but Beethoven, unable to hear the response, continued to face the chorus and orchestra; a singer finally turned him around so that he could see evidence of the affirmation that resounded throughout the hall. Other accounts maintain that the dramatic incident occurred at the end of the second movement scherzo. (At the time, it was common for audiences to applaud between movements.) Whenever the applause occurred, that it passed unnoticed by Beethoven makes clear that he never heard a note of his magnificent composition outside his own imagination” (Betsy Schwarm, Britannica).

This first edition of the score was published in August 1826, and Beethoven himself died shortly thereafter, on March 26, 1827. The printing of the score is itself a work of art: 226 stunning folio engraved pages on thick paper. This copy is exceptionally large with wide margins and nearly spotless. Complete with the printed subscriber’s list, and the first issue points (no metronome marks and plate number 2322).

Provenance: With the notations of legendary dealer, collector, and expert on musical manuscripts Albi Rosenthal (1914-2004) on the verso of the front free endpaper calling this copy “an unusually fine copy.” With exceptionally rare original blue front wrapper bound-in.

Sinfonie mit Schluss-Chor uber Schillers Ode: "An die Freude" fur grosses Orchester, 4 Solo- und 4 Chor-Stimmen componirt...von Ludwig van Beethoven. 125tes. Werk [full score], Mainz and Paris: B. Schotts Söhnen; Antwerp: A. Schott, [1826]. Folio (329x255 mm), contemporary half calf, with leather spine labels, marbled endpapers, edges dyed green. Some scuffs to binding, text exceptionally clean.

A BEAUTIFUL COPY OF THE VERY RARE FIRST EDITION OF ARGUABLY THE GREATEST WORK OF CLASSICAL MUSIC.

Price: $65,000 .